The Journal

Filed under Opinion Columns

Youth in Revolt

Back to Article
Back to Article

Youth in Revolt

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






From the shores of California all the way to New Zealand, we’re living in uncertain times. While our parents may have been able to get a lifelong job at twenty, ‘entitled millennials’ are lambasted for not being able to get a job that requires absurd amounts of experience for little pay. The world is lambasted with new technologies that further complicate our lives, governments are becoming increasingly more secretive yet invasive, and war rips families apart This is not strictly a problem in the US, either; for example, in Japan, young adults are not even dating, much less marrying. This is undoubtedly a time of change. While lives have gotten better in more ways than one, societies across the world are facing strange phenomena that suggest young people, especially young men, feel left out and unable to make changes. They feel unfulfilled.

In Japan, there are over 500,000 ‘hikikomori;’ young people who seclude themselves from the outside world. They don’t have jobs, and they’re often stereotyped as sitting and watching anime all day. They have become such a problem that the Japanese government has spoken about it. The West has a growing equivalent known as the NEET; ‘Not in Education, Employment, or Training.’ These are young people who have become so disgusted with the idea of working until they die that they’ve decided to completely renounce society altogether and simply live like hermits.

Other young Western people, especially men, have been joining ISIS- Even converting religions to do so. They often regret it after the fact, but the underlying problem is still there — the same as the one that causes young men to end up like the Chechen Boston Bombers or any number of gang members across the world. School shooters have a similar situation; the young men who commit these acts of violence in schools seem to be unsure of what to do with themselves, and either act out extremely violently, or seclude themselves entirely.

Perhaps this problem would go away if the YMCA was to become popular again, and if youth groups and state-run programs created to give young men jobs were to be revived. Or perhaps the problem is bigger than that, and this is only a symptom of being the first generation in a long time to be worse-off than our parents. Perhaps it is because technology is either secluding us or making us long for more primal, aggressive things.

In the uncertain times we live in today, it’s hard to tell. But there’s certainly one thing we can say about this ever-growing problem: there’s something wrong with the mental health of today’s youth – especially males — and the boys and young adults struggling with these illnesses should no longer be brushed under the rug as ‘people with mental illnesses,’ ‘thugs,’ or ‘extremist psychopaths.’ These are our brothers and sons, and they should no longer be ignored.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Navigate Left
  • Youth in Revolt

    Campus News

    Let’s Talk about Lightning (and Other Ways the English Language is WRONG)

  • Youth in Revolt

    Campus News

    Are You Feeling It Now Mr. Krabs?

  • Youth in Revolt

    Editorials

    The Little Things That BUG Me

  • Youth in Revolt

    Campus News

    Being Nice Isn’t Liberal

  • Youth in Revolt

    Editorials

    The Journey for The End

  • Youth in Revolt

    Editorials

    Vote! Because You Can

  • Youth in Revolt

    Campus News

    Between a Gen Z and a Millennial

  • Youth in Revolt

    Campus News

    Clean Water is a Human Right

  • Youth in Revolt

    Editorials

    The Sky Is Falling

  • Youth in Revolt

    Academics

    For Fair Internships

Navigate Right
Award winning, student run, weekly campus newspaper of the University of Illinois, Springfield..
Youth in Revolt