HOW DO YOU DO, FELLOW KIDS?

HOW+DO+YOU+DO%2C+FELLOW+KIDS%3F

Photographs courtesy of VERYWELLFAMILY.COM

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It’s lit. I stan! Slayyyy queeeeeen. Oumfph. Yeet. Ok boomer. And the endless, many more current things kids say online these days. They are becoming common words and phrases within our dictionary, online and between friends or within social media. Older generations still have yet to fully grasp what some of these words mean or how to properly use them in sentences. It might be a bit funny to hear your grandfather say “slay queen” or watch your mother do Fortnite dancing. However, not only are older generations trying to be “hip with the kids,” corporations are trying to get on this bus to make ads more relatable.

Corporations attempting to be relatable is not always a bad thing. Oftentimes, this tactic tends to be a marketing ploy in order to gather the younger generation into their gaze so that they might make a profit on them. However, other times these ploys are terrible as it attempts to paint these corporations like actual people, which they are not. In most cases, attempting to engage with younger generations using generational language to make themselves appear hip and cool, which is about as amusing as watching your grandmother dab. There comes a point when corporations attempting to be too relatable crosses a boundary that shouldn’t be crossed.

Sunny D once posted on their Twitter, “I can’t do this anymore.” A relatively harmless tweet that echoes what some of us have experienced in the past – helplessness, depression and even suicidal tendencies. Although the reason for the tweet was not meant to echo any mental health issues, many corporate twitter accounts began to attempt to “reach out” to Sunny D’s twitter account telling them that there are ways to get help. Be it a ploy to be more “hip with the kids” using mental health issues as a way to connect with younger generations, depression is nothing to laugh at. In fact, many people might consider it insulting that a corporation is using mental health to make it seem they are like the normal person.

Although corporate social media attempting to be relatable might sound fun or amusing, it is always important to remember that these corporations are not trying to be your friend. All they want from you is your money, and oftentimes will try to trick you into thinking they’re real people.